A meal in an English pub

A meal in an English pub

A meal in an English pub

A meal in an English pub is a great way to meet up with friends for an informal chat, drink and to have something to eat.

However, as you will hear, pubs can be busy and noisy places and are sometimes not the best place to have a conversation – but this podcast is a real-life situation, where Chris and Stéphane went to a busy pub in Victoria, London, England.

Bar snacks: Even pubs that don’t serve meals have a few salty bar snacks available – crisps in a range of flavors, packets of peanuts, and pork scratchings – and sometimes big glass jars of pickled eggs and pickled onions.

Bar food or bar menu: Some pubs that serve lunch and dinner may also have a bar menu of sandwiches through the day. Bar food is only prepared once and is only available as long as it lasts.

Pub meals: Better pubs serve lunches and dinners during set hours. These range from basic, acceptable food to the highest reaches of gastronomy. Several gastropubs, so-called, have even achieved multiple Michelin stars.

Pub meals can be cheaper than traditional restaurant meals but whether they are better value depends on your taste. You may love a Sunday Roast – meat, potatoes, Yorkshire pudding, and vegetables. Or you may find it overcooked and tasteless – depends on the pub and depends on you. Nevertheless, there are some pub dishes you can usually count on including:

Sausages and Mash, using locally made, butcher’s sausages
Fish and chips
Steak and ale or steak and kidney pies
Ploughman’s lunches – salad with a hunk of local cheese and bread. Ham or chicken may be included.
Be careful though, the closing hours are much earlier than in continental Europe and elsewhere and most pubs stop serving food at or before 9pm in the evening, so get there early!

Some pubs also do early eaters deals where two people eat for the price of one – if you like eating early, this may be for you.

While listening listen out for how the the following was expressed :

  1. How did Chris say that he had not met Stéphane for a long time.
  2. How did Chris ask Stéphane what he had been doing since they last met?
  3. How did Chris ask Stéphane about how he feels about his upcoming holidays?
  4. How did Chris ask Stéphane if he would like a starter?
  5. How did Chris ask Stéphane if he wanted a main course?
  6. How did Chris ask Stéphane about what came with his meal?
  7. What type of water did they order?
History of Food QUIZ

History of Food QUIZ

History of Food QUIZ

Do you know the origins of your favorite foods ? Have you ever wondered where your favourite foods came from? You’d be surprised to discover the origins behind some of the most popular foods in the world. Have you thought about the origins of the hamburger, sandwich, French baguette or even the more fancy desserts?This quiz will really surprise you !

Many of the recipes and staple foods that we enjoy are the result of social change, economic consequences or sometimes just plain “happy” mistakes.

Many dishes that we think come from one country, either do not originate there, or are served in a completely different manner. Some things that we consider to be extremely popular in certain countries, or even believe are national dishes in certain places, may originate loosely in that country but are rarely eaten there.

Try this quiz, be prepared to be surprised ! 

History of Food Quiz

Try this quiz to whet your taste buds, expand your general knowledge and your English vocabulary.

You may not know the answer immediately so try to consider which answer options are probable, likely, possible, highly unlikely or just a joke !

Enjoy and Bon Appétit. 

Here at EFL Podblog we love to talk about food. So check out our series of food conversations which range from our favorite foods (intermediate level) to fancy high tech cooking (advanced level) to writing a food blog (pre-intermediate and intermediate level) . Enjoy and make a note of new vocabulary that you can use everyday !

 

The Foods We miss from The UK

Molecular gastronomy

Victoria – English Food Blogger

Regional food: Derbyshire

Regional food: Derbyshire

Regional food: Derbyshire

All countries have regional food specialities; France is famous for its regional cuisine and world wide renowned foods but what about the UK ? What types of dishes do you associate with the UK ?

Sue is from Derbyshire and she has a bit of difficulty trying to name 5 regional specialities ! 

Do you know where Derbyshire is ? Google it to find out !!!

She mentions 5 regional specialities, listen to the podcast and then take a look at these pictures and try to find the correct name for each dish.

 How does Sue describe this tart?

 

What does Sue really like about this meal ?

 

 What makes this cheese so green ?

 

 

When do we eat this particular cheese ?

 What does Chris say about this Northern speciality? 

 Where is this beer brewed ?

The food we miss from home part 2

The food we miss from home part 2

The Foods We miss from home part 2 – When living away from home, your tastes change and you learn to adapt to the local food and end up loving it in most cases.

That said, we can still miss some of the food from back home and from time to time, get a craving for those tastes.

Now, I’m not saying that French food is not good – far from it – but no matter how long you are away from home, you still may get a mad desire to eat the foods that you grew up with and this is the theme of today’s podcast.

You may even find that when you eventually get hold of the foods from back home.

You know the ones that you craved, they may have an anti-climax effect on you and you realise that your mind has been playing tricks on you and you don’t really like them as much as you thought you did.

When we first came to France, it was virtually impossible to find any of the food that we ate back in the UK, however, many are now available in bigger cities or where there is a concentration of expats.

At times when we cannot find the foods that we crave, we have the choice to either make them ourselves, where possible, or to substitue French foods for those that we miss.

Examples are making my own clotted cream – a long process, but well worth it!

Substituting ‘Poitrine fumé’ for bacon and using Toulouse sausages in place of English sausages, for when you just cannot go without an English breakfast.

There are certain things that cannot be substituted though, such as Marmite – I mean nothing comes close – although some would question why anyone would seek out Marmite. As Brits, we also miss two favourite British meals ; Indian curry and Fish & Chips.

Fish and chips and curry are available in France, but sorry France, they’re not as good as back in the UK!

The first part is here

The Foods We miss from The UK

The Foods We miss from The UK

The Foods We miss from The UK When living away from home, your tastes change and you learn to adapt to the local food and end up loving it in most cases.

That said, we can still miss some of the food from back home and from time to time, get a craving for those tastes.

Now, I’m not saying that French food is not good – far from it – but no matter how long you are away from home, you still may get a mad desire to eat the foods that you grew up with and this is the theme of today’s podcast.

You may even find that when you eventually get hold of the foods from back home.

You know the ones that you craved, they may have an anti-climax effect on you and you realise that your mind has been playing tricks on you and you don’t really like them as much as you thought you did.

When we first came to France, it was virtually impossible to find any of the food that we ate back in the UK, however, many are now available in bigger cities or where there is a concentration of expats.

At times when we cannot find the foods that we crave, we have the choice to either make them ourselves, where possible, or to substitue French foods for those that we miss.

Examples are making my own clotted cream – a long process, but well worth it!

Substituting ‘Poitrine fumé’ for bacon and using Toulouse sausages in place of English sausages, for when you just cannot go without an English breakfast.

There are certain things that cannot be substituted though, such as Marmite – I mean nothing comes close – although some would question why anyone would seek out Marmite. As Brits, we also miss two favourite British meals ; Indian curry and Fish & Chips.

Fish and chips and curry are available in France, but sorry France, they’re not as good as back in the UK!

Yuka The Healthy Eating App

Yuka The Healthy Eating App

Yuka The Healthy Eating App that checks out the quality of your shopping basket
Do you really know what you eat?
Well yes! With Yuka The Healthy Eating App you can scan your products and analyze their impact on your health.

In the blink of an eye, Yuka The Healthy Eating App decodes complicated and sometimes confusing labels for you: you visualise products that are good and those that are best avoided.

Get personalized recommendations for your shopping
When you scan a product that has a negative impact on your health, Yuka The Healthy Eating App recommends a better equivalent product.

So, you continue to enjoy yourself while eating healthier!

An independent evaluation based on 3 criteria

Nutritional quality
60% of the evaluation is based on nutritional quality, which takes into account the amount of energy, saturated fats, sugars, salt, fruits and vegetables, fiber and protein of the product. The calculation method is based on the Nutriscore (brand of Public Health France), built by Professor Serge Hercberg. 

Additives
30% of the evaluation is based on the presence of harmful additives in the product. Yuka is based on many sources that have studied the dangerousness of food additives, among which are: “Food additives” Corinne Gouget, “Food additives” Maire-Laure André and the studies of the UFC Que Choisir, The French equivalent of ‘Which’ Magazine.

Biological dimension
10% of the evaluation is based on the biological dimension of the product.

Products considered organic are those with the French bio label (AB) and / or the European organic label (Eurofeuille)
Yuka uses the OpenFoodFacts free database.

Yuka The Healthy Eating App is free and available for download to a smartphone – have a look at the Yuka Website.

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