Ayurveda the science of life

Ayurveda the science of life

Ayurveda the science of life is an medicine system with historical roots in the Indian subcontinent.

Ayurveda is heavily practiced in India and Nepal, where around 80% of the population report using it.

Ayurveda therapies have varied and evolved over more than two millennia.

Therapies include medicines, special diets, meditation, yoga, massage, laxatives, enemas, and medical oils.

Medicines are typically based on complex herbal compounds, minerals, and metal substances (perhaps under the influence of early Indian alchemy or rasa shastra).

Ancient Ayurveda texts also taught surgical techniques, including rhinoplasty, kidney stone extractions, sutures, and the extraction of foreign objects.

The main classical Ayurveda texts begin with accounts of the transmission of medical knowledge from the gods to sages, and then to human physicians.

In Sushruta Samhita (Sushruta’s Compendium), Sushruta wrote that Dhanvantari, Hindu god of Ayurveda, incarnated himself as a king of Varanasi and taught medicine to a group of physicians, including Sushruta.

 Ayurveda has been adapted for Western consumption, notably by Baba Hari Dass in the 1970s and Maharishi Ayurveda in the 1980s.

Some scholars assert that Ayurveda originated in prehistoric times, and that some of the concepts of Ayurveda have existed from the time of the Indus Valley Civilization or even earlier.

Ayurveda developed significantly during the Vedic period and later some of the non-Vedic systems such as Buddhism and Jainism also developed medical concepts and practices that appear in the classical Ayurveda texts.

In Ayurveda texts, Doṣa balance is emphasized, and suppressing natural urges is considered unhealthy and claimed to lead to illness.

Ayurveda treatises describe three elemental doṣas viz. vāta, pitta and kapha, and state that balance (Skt. sāmyatva) of the doṣas results in health, while imbalance (viṣamatva) results in disease. Ayurveda treatises divide medicine into eight canonical components.

Ayurveda practitioners had developed various medicinal preparations and surgical procedures from at least the beginning of the common era.

Listen to Renu, an Ayurveda practioner in north India talk about Ayurveda.

Using a SWOT to enhance personal learning

Using a SWOT to enhance personal learning

Using a SWOT to enhance personal learning

One of the hardest things to do alone is to effectively carry out a skills self-evaluation before setting up clear objectives towards a Personal Learning Plan (PLP).

Knowing where one is at a given time is not an easy task due to a variety of reasons, one being the difficulty in being objective with oneself – the ability to take a step back and see things as they are, without being overshadowed by emotive aspects.

It also depends a lot on how we are as a person:

A confident person and a person with lower self-esteem, will have diametrically opposed difficulties in evaluating themselves both realistically and objectively.

Embarking on this task, alone is quite a challenging undertaking.

Using a SWOT to enhance personal learning – SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats) analysis can really help in gaining clarity and setting realistic objectives and is a simple tool that can be used alone, but which can be further exploited with the help of a coach.

The SWOT analysis is a simple matrix as shown below:

EXTERNAL INTERNAL
Strengths Weaknesses
Opportunities Threats

The idea is to start out by looking at where you are now in terms of your goals, aims and objectives and to discover where effort needs to be focued in order to reach your goals.

The process is reflective and involves a certain degree of metacognition (thinking about your own thinking) in order to be able to effectively accomplish the task.

In order to demonstrate the concept, let’s take Claire, a working mum, who wants to progress in her job – this is just to illustrate an example – it could be any subject and a SWOT can also be used in other contexts.

Using a SWOT to enhance personal learning is great for strategic planning and project feasibility studies as the focus is largely a 360° approach and very analytical, but one which entails action steps and change as a consequence.

Claire has a strong desire to progress in her job, but she has never really been able to succeed due to many barriers which systematically get in the way, and which she cannot seem to surmount, at least on her own.

She has never really been obsessively nor aggressively ambitious and has always put her family before herself, but now wants to move to a more interesting job with more responsibility.

When embarking on a SWOT, it is easy to fall into the trap of being able to fill the Weaknesses section easily and then be short of Strengths – it is sometimes dialectic, in as much as a Weakness can also be an Opportunity as a Threat can also become a Strength.

She has decided to start work with a coach to be able to get things moving as she has never quite got there alone and feels that this is a good opportunity for her, both in her life and in her career.

Her coach has asked her to fill in the SWOT matrix, which she does before they meet again.

STRENGTHS and WEAKNESSES are known as Internal elements that either create or reduce value, whilst OPPORTUNITIES and THREATS are known as External elements that can form barriers to learning but that are often not fully controlled by the learner.

The questions to ask are: What am I good at / what qualities or skills do I possess?

STRENGTHS

What are the qualities / skills that I need to develop that I am aware of ?

WEAKNESSES

How can I use my STRENGTHS to overcome my weaknesses, to move into new areas of learning?

OPPORTUNITIES

What hinders or prevents me from reaching my goals?

THREATS

STRENGTHS

Communication, Punctual, Telephone manner, Organised, Conscientious, Experience in the company, Motivated

WEAKNESSES

IT Skills, Foreign Language skills, Time Management, Management skills, Lack of experience of team management Gets easily stressed, Lack of self-confidence

OPPORTUNITIES

More responsibilities, Variety in new job, Learn new skills, Higher salary, Company car, be part of the decision making process

THREATS

Lives far from work, Difficulty to travel, Family commitments, Age, etc.

Coaching a person through a SWOT analysis is both a negotiated and an awareness process, predominately made up of questioning, but essentially, it must be free of judgement or preconceived ideas.

The coach decides to use another tool to complement the SWOT process, a Confrontation Matrix, which is used to offset the Strengths with Opportunities and Threat, and the Weaknesses with the same, as shown below:

EXTERNAL /INTERNAL OPPORTUNITIES THREATS
STRENGTHS ATTACK STRATEGY ADJUSTMENT STRATEGY
WEAKNESSES DEFENCE STRATEGY SURVIVAL STRATEGY

In the SWOT matrix, the coach helps the learner to offset STRENGTHS with OPPORTUNITIES / STRENGTHS with THREATS and consequently, WEAKNESSES with OPPORTUNITIES / WEAKNESSES with THREATS in order to produce a set of action steps or a PLP to help the learner progress to the next step, which, in this case, will be a set of decisions and plans to move into the new job.

The value of a SWOT is that it is a way of seeing where a learner is at a given point in time and where they need to be in the future.

It can help build a clear Learning Action Plan with specific goals, timescales and measurement variables built in.

If you intend using a SWOT analysis there are some do’s and don’ts to be aware of in order to guarantee the success of the process:

  1. Don’t expect people to be able to fill in the matrix without a clear briefing of how it will be used and the type of elements that it should include.
  2. Ensure that there is adequate thought and process time to be able to complete the matrix.
  3. Understand that the SWOT is ephemeral. That it could be filled-in today and change tomorrow. People, contexts and situations are constantly in a state of flux.
  4. Ensure that there are clear guidelines and boundaries on confidentiality. The only sharing is done by the learner – who can invite the coach/mentor to be present if they want to debrief their managers on the process and outcomes.
  5. Be aware that people with low self-esteem will naturally include more weaknesses than strengths – they will need help evoking their qualities, skills and qualities more than confident people.
  6. The process should be viewed as a positive and fun process, with benefits clearly set-out for the learner.
  7. Remember that the coach will learn a great deal from the process, which can be used as another building-block in the coach’s development.
  8. There needs to be a bond of trust between learner and coach/mentor, built before embarking on a SWOT
Effective Presentation Skills Tips episode 1

Effective Presentation Skills Tips episode 1

Effective Presentation Skills Tips episode 1

Effective Presentation Skills Tips episode 1

Effective Presentation Skills Tips episode 1 is part of a series of podcasts aimed at helping people to be more effective when presenting in front of an audience.

Sue and Chris talk about some of the pitfalls in presentations, including managing stress, information overload and why people deliver presentations.

Presenting information clearly and effectively is one of the key soft skills, if not the most important soft skill for life, and especially in business.

Getting your message or opinion across is essential, and, today, presentation skills are required in almost every field of professional life.

If you are a manager, a technician, an engineer, a student, business owner or whatever, you may very well be asked to make a presentation at some point.

This can be something that not all of us relish.

This series of podcasts are meant to help you avoid some of the common mistakes that some presenters make, so that you can get your message across effectively and engage with your audience..

Everything that Sue and Chris talk about is about common sense skills that can be applied by anyone in a presentation, there are no miracle answers, just pragmatic tips that actually work.

After all, there is no point being the best student, manager, technician or engineer in your organisation if you cannot effectively communicate what you know and convince others.

Preparation is the most important part of a successful presentation and is a part that is often neglected by speakers.

This is the crucial foundation and there are no short-cuts to excellence.

If you suffer from glossophobia, then this series of podcasts may help you a lot.

Glossophobia is the fear of public speaking.

The word glossophobia comes from the Greek γλῶσσα glōssa, meaning tongue, and φόβος phobos, fear or dread.

Find more at:  http://www.skillsyouneed.com/presentation-skills.html#ixzz4MsrDtTgx

The worst invention to be pitched on Dragon’s Den

Stress gets to a presenter on Dragon’s Den

Even Steve Jobs couldn’t convince the Dragons

Effective Presentation Skills Tips episode 1

Effective Presentation Skills Tips Episode 2

Effective Presentation Skills Tips episode 2

Effective Presentation Skills Tips episode 2 is the second part of a series of podcasts aimed at helping people to be more effective when presenting in front of an audience.

Sue and Chris talk about some of the pitfalls in presentations, including managing stress, redundancy, communication problems and telling an audience what they already know.

Presenting information clearly and effectively is one of the key soft skills, if not the most important soft skill for life, and especially in business.

Getting your message or opinion across is essential, and, today, presentation skills are required in almost every field of professional life.

If you are a manager, a technician, an engineer, a student, business owner or whatever, you may very well be asked to make a presentation at some point.

This can be something that not all of us relish.

This series of podcasts are meant to help you avoid some of the common mistakes that some presenters make, so that you can get your message across effectively and engage with your audience..

Everything that Sue and Chris talk about is about common sense skills that can be applied by anyone in a presentation, there are no miracle answers, just pragmatic tips that actually work.

After all, there is no point being the best student, manager, technician or engineer in your organisation if you cannot communicate what you do and what you want others to do.

Covid lockdown and stress; how are you coping?

Covid lockdown and stress; how are you coping?

There is no doubt that the successive lockdowns of 2020-21 have dramatically changed our daily lives on so many levels, and figures show that more people have experienced anxiety due to the social, financial and work restrictions that have been placed on us.

We took the opportunity to talk to Said, who is using his personal experience with overcoming a serious illness to pass the message about the benefits that a positive mindset can have on health outcomes.

So, we asked him to give his take on how our attitude can affect the way we have to deal with the difficulties of successive lockdowns and how we can avoid getting bogged down by the  hurdles that the pandemic has thrown at us.

While listening, listen out for these words:

to heal yourself / to cure yourself = to get better after an illness

your mindset = the way you think about problems and difficulties

“good and bad are two sides of the same coin”

“We create our own happiness”   /  “What makes you happy”. Notice that “happiness” is the noun and that “happy” is the adjective.

The tough aspects of lockdown= the difficult aspects of lockdown

To be grateful  = to appreciate the good things that we have

 If you would like to know more about Said and his wellness journey click on this link to go to his YouTube channel Wanderer Footsteps. 

 

 

Is my workplace a stressful place?

Is my workplace a stressful place?

Excessive workplace stress causes a staggering 120,000 deaths and results in nearly €200 billion in health care costs each year.

This represents 5% to 8% of national health care spending, derived primarily from high demands at work (€50 billion) and work-family conflict (€25 billion).

These are some of the harmful health effects from excessive stress:

  • Reduced ability to cope with future stress and increased anxiety and chronic depression;
  • The onset of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD);
  • Reduced immune system functioning;
  • Increased inflammation and depression.

High on-the-job demands and insufficient resources contribute to stress.

In addition, an effort-rewards imbalance with perceptions of high effort and low compensation or recognition can also contribute to workplace stress.

Goals perceived as exceedingly difficult or unclear, rather than achievable challenges, are also factors in excessive stress, anger, and anxiety.

Try this survey to find out if you are at risk or are working in a stressful environment at work.


Is my workplace a stressful place?

Micro managers, annoying co-workers and unrealistic objectives - just three things known that make people stressed at work.
It doesn't matter whether you're based in an office or a warehouse, being unable to cope with the pressures at work can make your life unbearable.
Not only does it take its toll on you emotionally, it can leave you at higher risk of a range of physical illnesses.
Stress in the workplace can lead to :

• Anxiety and chronic tension
• Agitation and fits of panic
• Aggression and short temper
• Mood swings and disorientation
• Negative self-talk
• Sleeping difficulties and constant fatigue
• Lack of energy
• Eating more (or less), drinking more (or less)
• Pessimism and despondency
• Lack of motivation
• Gradual withdrawal from society and friends

Take this test to evaluate if your workplace is causing you stress*.

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* This Content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. 
Always seek the advice of your doctor or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.
Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this or any other Website)

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