Are you a manager or a leader

Are you a manager or a leader

 

Are you a manager or a leader

Try this quiz  Are you a manager or a leader to find out where you are.

5 Ways Being A Good Follower Makes You A Better Leader

 

management v leader

The world is filled with managers and leaders and those that are managed and led - we all help the world go round. All are necessary for a successful business to function well. When companies stagnate, it's the leader who sets a new direction and vision and brings the entire organisation around to meet the goals and objectives . Which role are you? The 10-question quiz below will help you find out which of the roles you fit into and feel the most comfortable in. No need to answer dishonestly since a higher score does not make you a winner - you will be fooling yourself. There is no single right answer to each question.

NB: This is a podcast / blog site – we are not an encyclopaedia, any information is given free of charge and as is.

We do not Spam, retain email addresses or use anyone’s information in any way – if you must comment on Facebook, please do not troll or give unconstructive negative feedback, but any feedback or comments that are constructive or helpful for us or our learners/subscibers is always welcomed.

Effective Presentation Skills Tips Episode 2

Effective Presentation Skills Tips Episode 2

Effective Presentation Skills Tips episode 1

Effective Presentation Skills Tips episode 2

Effective Presentation Skills Tips episode 2 is the second part of a series of podcasts aimed at helping people to be more effective when presenting in front of an audience.

Sue and Chris talk about some of the pitfalls in presentations, including managing stress, redundancy, communication problems and telling an audience what they already know.

Presenting information clearly and effectively is one of the key soft skills, if not the most important soft skill for life, and especially in business.

Getting your message or opinion across is essential, and, today, presentation skills are required in almost every field of professional life.

If you are a manager, a technician, an engineer, a student, business owner or whatever, you may very well be asked to make a presentation at some point.

This can be something that not all of us relish.

This series of podcasts are meant to help you avoid some of the common mistakes that some presenters make, so that you can get your message across effectively and engage with your audience..

Everything that Sue and Chris talk about is about common sense skills that can be applied by anyone in a presentation, there are no miracle answers, just pragmatic tips that actually work.

After all, there is no point being the best student, manager, technician or engineer in your organisation if you cannot communicate what you do and what you want others to do.

Effective Presentation Skills Tips Episode 2

Effective Presentation Skills Tips episode 1

Effective Presentation Skills Tips episode 1

Effective Presentation Skills Tips episode 1

Effective Presentation Skills Tips episode 1 is part of a series of podcasts aimed at helping people to be more effective when presenting in front of an audience.

Sue and Chris talk about some of the pitfalls in presentations, including managing stress, information overload and why people deliver presentations.

Presenting information clearly and effectively is one of the key soft skills, if not the most important soft skill for life, and especially in business.

Getting your message or opinion across is essential, and, today, presentation skills are required in almost every field of professional life.

If you are a manager, a technician, an engineer, a student, business owner or whatever, you may very well be asked to make a presentation at some point.

This can be something that not all of us relish.

This series of podcasts are meant to help you avoid some of the common mistakes that some presenters make, so that you can get your message across effectively and engage with your audience..

Everything that Sue and Chris talk about is about common sense skills that can be applied by anyone in a presentation, there are no miracle answers, just pragmatic tips that actually work.

After all, there is no point being the best student, manager, technician or engineer in your organisation if you cannot effectively communicate what you know and convince others.

Preparation is the most important part of a successful presentation and is a part that is often neglected by speakers.

This is the crucial foundation and there are no short-cuts to excellence.

If you suffer from glossophobia, then this series of podcasts may help you a lot.

Glossophobia is the fear of public speaking.

The word glossophobia comes from the Greek γλῶσσα glōssa, meaning tongue, and φόβος phobos, fear or dread.

Find more at:  http://www.skillsyouneed.com/presentation-skills.html#ixzz4MsrDtTgx

The worst invention to be pitched on Dragon’s Den

Stress gets to a presenter on Dragon’s Den

Even Steve Jobs couldn’t convince the Dragons

What’s the problem with social learning?

What’s the problem with social learning?

What’s the problem with social learning?

What’s the problem with social learning?

Well, there are many – one thing is that it actually works, which can send a shudder of fear up the spine of some mainstream educators. Like it or not, some education systems are built around the teacher’s needs and a lot less around the needs of learners and a lot of teachers meticulously plan (for) lessons, but not necessarily for learners. That said, I am sure that there are a lot of teachers that resist and are actually very creative and in tune with their learner’s needs and do deliver on this, but is this really the case for the majority?

Other reasons are that people are generally not perceived to be formatted for social learning, even though they do it without knowing it.

Then there is the old chestnut of confusion of terms.

I mean, ‘Social’ for a start – that means time off, sitting around a table with friends or a pint in the pub, and enjoying oneself, doesn’t it?

And ‘Learning’ is often confused with teaching, or at least in the guise that many of us have encountered it in school, and often far beyond.

Social learning must incorporate notions of autonomy, by its very nature.

Autonomy, doesn’t that mean independence, freedom and getting on and doing things alone?

Autonomy does indeed include freedom and, to some extent independence – but this is a freedom of choice in learning Where, when, and how we like, and very often with whom we like – but it is not anarchic in any way.

In social learning, from my understanding, we don’t talk about freedom as ‘independence’ but more as ‘inter-dependence’ – working / learning and communicating with, and from, others.

If people are to learn anything they need to be taught by a teacher, don’t they?

I don’t know, what do you think?

Sometimes, at least at school, working in collaboration with others – well that’s just plain copying and we won’t stand for any of that around here…

That said, many schools are embracing project work, where learners work together on common goals, but this is not the case for every subject, nor indeed, in every school.

Social learning, I believe, can, and does just happen, but the most effective way for it to occur is when it is facilitated in some way – I am carefully avoiding the term ‘taught’.

Facilitation? – how can that ever work – you need someone with a firm body of knowledge – learning is just a transfer of knowledge from one to another, or one to many, isn’t it ?

Firstly, let’s come back to the title – you’re reading this either because you agree with the statement or that you disagree wholeheartedly, or maybe you are just curious to see what I have to say on this – either way, I’ve got your attention.

Now let’s look at the way education has been set up and run over the last few centuries – an insight into one of the few things in life that has remained pretty much stationary over the last two or three hundred years.

In the pre-industrial Revolution, most learning, except for the privileged classes, was a one-to-one phenomena, called « sitting by Nelly », where trades were learnt from an experienced worker, showing and checking the performance of an apprentice until they were ready to do the job alone.

During and after the Industrial Revolution, education then evolved into the model that is traditionally used to this day – the teacher and the class – One-to-many.

The power dynamic being in the hands of the one with the knowledge, who would then sprinkle it on anyone willing to take it up.

This, in my opinion, is nearing its sell-by-date as external pressures, in terms of rapid technological change, exert their influence on the validity and pertinence of this model.

The teacher is dead, long live the teacher – but how are kids and adults going to learn?

Enter Social Learning – we have actually been doing this for centuries, although we may not have known it – or rather not really thought about putting a label on it.

Social, refers to the system in which humans thrive – a society – not always linked to spare-time, leisure or enjoyment, although, spare-time and enjoyment are some of the key aspects of social learning – well, learning in short.

The main concept behind social learning is that ‘no man [sic] is an island’, that we learn best when we are interacting and collaborating with others – this works well in the workplace (usually) but is often penalised in school, branded as copying or worse.

Of course there are teachers who are aware of the shortcomings of the traditional educational model, who are actively putting into place activities that are dragging the classroom into the 21st century, leveraging social media and technology to facilitate this.

However, the dynamics of social learning are not used in any formal testing system – there are no marking criteria that I am aware of that take into account group collaboration dynamics or serendipitous learning.

Arguments that I have heard are that they are just too complex to evaluate … so let’s just stay with evaluating what we know how to evaluate – right and wrong answers on a formal test / evaluation / examination.

Now, we can all recognise that it will take a virtual [sic] revolution in education to implement any form of evaluation system to encompass the variables of social learning – but it is not impossible to achieve.

We all can see that, but there will surely come a time, when the head will need to be removed from the sand, if only to adapt to technological change, which in turn is driving social change.

Social learning is what we all do best, and is what we have always done best, so why is it often seen as something new and almost as something to be avoided?

Social Learning – what we have been doing all along

Social Learning – what we have been doing all along

Social Learning – what we have been doing all along

Social learning theory integrates behavioral and cognitive theories of learning in order to provide a comprehensive model that could account for the wide range of learning experiences that occur in the real world.

Some feel that Social Learning lacks structure – or at least the structure that they are used to – a teacher, in a class, a fairly rigid form of curriculum …

There is nothing wrong with structure, in fact it’s a great thing and we all need some form of structure in our life, although structure overload can impose barriers that are both frustrating and limiting.

A great many structured learning systems and models tend to almost disregard the ‘learner in the loop’ effect in learning, putting the emphasis, sometimes unintentionally, on isolation rather than on involvement and accountability.

Elearning is a good example of this, although a lot of Elearning is touted as some form of social learning as a new concept – something I have been writing about since 2009 on my blog, learning 3.0 – although the evidence for the social element, is at best, somewhat flimsy.

Social learning is not a new concept, Social Learning – what we have been doing all along, although it, apparently, can cut some ice as a selling point for an LMS (Learning Management System) or a CLMS (just add ‘Content’ on the front of the former).

As I have argued before, in L3.0, in my opinion, virtually [sic] all learning is social learning, and has been that from the beginning of time, although we have tried to engineer the nature of learning into structured systems that go heavily against the grain.

Social learning is when learners learn together and from each other, leveraging any tools that enhance that learning – in the Web 2.0 world, that can mean just about anything on the Internet, including social media and all the advantages and disadvantages that this may offer. It can provide fabulous opportunities and implications for learning, but, and this is a big but, the roles of learning professionals will and have to change fundamentally.

The benefits of social learning, although the term may not have been formally used, has been argued for decades by the likes of Lev Vygotsky, Albert Bandura, Carl Rogers et al. The question still remains as to why the take up has been so slow and often shunned by learning professionals. There are those that have a firm belief in the social learning model, but it is still seen, in many circles, as a novel phenomenum.

It’s not about the tools !

The tools that share the appelation, « social », such as social media – Twitter, Facebook, Slideshare, LinkedIn, Yammer, Daily Motion etc., etc., are all great tools, but they are not social learning, however, they can be a part of it, as books, role plays, problem solving, forums, discussions etc., can too.

Humans are social animals by nature, basically there are 10 points that need to be addressed in order for social learning to work effectively in the majority of learning settings :

  1. OBJECTIVES – objectives need to be clearly set regarding what is to be learnt and agreed upon by the learners – better still if they are instrumental in setting the goals of learning. There is no point setting objectives without the buy-in of the major stakeholder, the learner, although many learning models do just that. Put simply, have a goal – as when we set out to get nowhere, we usually get there.
  1. GROUP – being part of a group is a key element in social learning – Social, doesn’t mean informal, in fact social learning can be very formal. In order for it to work there needs to be a deep feeling of belonging to a group or team and participating in the group as much as possible – learning is not a spectator sport.
  1. VOICE – all members of the group need to feel that they have something to say, it may be to add something to the discussion, to ask questions or to support other members of the group, but it has to be in a setting where dialogue is free from judgement.
  1. COMPETITION – Sometimes called gamification in virtual learning settings, a healthy culture of competition, either individually or for groups is a good motivator.
  1. FEEL GOOD FACTOR – Nothing is more demotivating than feeling that you are banging your head against a brick wall, and this is so true in any learning situation. Feeling achievement and progress in learning is essential, which, in turn, leads to an increase in self-confidence and self esteem.
  1. SUPPORT – Learners need to feel supported, not carried, both by a facilitator and by the members of the group. Without support learners can lose track of the big picture, feel isolated and feel that they are not advancing towards their goals, aims and objectives.
  1. AUTONOMY – Not to be confused with independence, but more on inter-dependence, working together in collaborative mode. Autonomy simply means that learners are empowered, responsible and accountable for their learning – more about the how, where and when they learn, but also the way in which they learn. Learners who have a active stake in their learning, usually ensure that they succeed.
  1. VOCABULARY – The choice of vocabulary used, clearly reflects the way you view learning and your role within it. Using vocabulary such as ; « Class, lessons, teacher, student, classroom etc. » will also have a clear impact on the way your learners learn, the way you work and how learners view the power dynamics in learning. This may seem petty, but think about it. “Nothing that is worth knowing can be taught.” ~ Oscar Wilde
  1. ACCIDENTAL LEARNING – Informal learning should be encouraged as much as possible, as a lot of what we learn on the fringes of what we set out to learn is hugely important. Sometimes we disregard what was learnt in a learning episode. As Seneca put it, « Luck is what happens when preparation meets opportunity. »
  1. REFLECTION – Reflective learning is one of the main ingredients that go into Lifelong Learning and learning how to learn – one of the core skills in learning. Reflective learning is a way of helping learners step back from their learning experience, helping them develop critical thinking skills and improve on future performance by analysing experiences in learning. We learn more by looking for the answer to a question and not finding it, than we do from learning the answer itself (Lloyd Alexander).

Social learning should be fun, as when we enjoy what we are doing there is a good chance that we will learn [something], however, social learning is not just for fun.

Collaboration and interconnectivity in learning exponentially increases the rate at which learning occurs – the old adage, ‘two (or more) heads are better than one’ has never rang truer.

In the age where companies are banning the use of Internet, YouTube, facebook and Twitter et al., we could perhaps question this, in terms of social learning, or at least as far as informal learning goes.

There will always be time-wasters who spend hours on the Internet doing non-job related stuff, but should we worry about how much collaboration and learning is passing under the corporate nose, through these social blanket bans ?

Social learning has been here for ages, literally, and is set to become more a part of the learning landscape in the future – Social Learning – what we have been doing all along.

“Everyone and everything around you is your teacher.”~Ken Keyes

 

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